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VASCULAR

 

 

Goodman Campbell surgeons who superspecialize in vascular neurosurgery have international training and experience in blood vessel abnormalities of the brain and spinal cord. If a procedure is being successfully performed somewhere in the world, it is available to our patients.

Check out the videos and diagrams in our Neuropedia for an even better understanding of vascular-related conditions, treatments and anatomy.

The brain represents 2% of our body weight, yet it receives 15% of the blood that flows through our bodies—more than any other organ. When blood flow in one or more of the multiple arteries and veins to the brain and spinal cord is blocked by a ruptured blood vessel, an obstruction such as a clot, or pressure from a tumor, the result is a stroke. Each year, there are more than 750,000 new strokes in America, the country's leading cause of disability and 3rd leading cause of death. Early diagnosis, the very latest treatment advances and a team of specialists and internationally regarded authorities are critical to the most successful treatment.

 


 

Common Questions

WHAT IS VASCULAR NEUROSURGERY?

Surgery that focuses on identifying and strengthening blood vessel (vascular) abnormalities of the brain and spinal cord. This minimally invasive surgery takes place inside the blood vessels (endovascular) with the insertion of a small tube (catheter). Stroke correction or prevention may include blood vessel bypass or the use of tiny clips, coils, or stents to treat blood vessel walls that balloon outward at a branching site (aneurysms). Three of our neurosurgeons and two neuroradiologists are specially trained in vascular abnormalities of the brain and spine and are experienced at working together to offer patients every possible treatment option available.

 

HOW DOES SUPERSPECIALIZATION AFFECT QUALITY OF CARE?

Superspecialization is a combination of in-depth training and experience in a particular area of neurosurgery. Goodman Campbell surgeons who subspecialize in vascular neurosurgery have international training and experience in blood vessel abnormalities of the brain and spinal cord. If a procedure is being successfully performed somewhere in the world, it is available to our patients. Our specialists were first in the state to coil an aneurysm, to use glue in the treatment of AVMs and to place stents in intracranial vessels. For over thirty years, our vascular neurosurgeons and neuroradiologists have been actively involved in international technique and disease process research and education.

 

WHAT ILLNESSES ARE TREATED WITH THIS TYPE OF SURGERY?

Vascular neurosurgery focuses on the following conditions:

Aneurysms: A ballooning blood vessel wall at a branching site causing weakness and potential bleeding (hemorrhage)

AVMs: Arteriovenous malformations are abnormal tangles of weakened blood vessels present from birth which may cause seizures or hemorrhage

Cavernous Angiomas: Abnormal weak blood vessels that can cause seizures or hemorrhage

Dural Arteriovenous Malformations: Abnormal connections between arteries and veins that may cause hemorrhage or neurological injury, such as stroke or weakness in the extremities

Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Strokes: A narrowing or complete blockage of a blood vessel to the brain (ischemic) or a rupture of blood vessels (hemorrhagic) potentially due to high blood pressure

 

HOW TO SPOT THE SIGNS OF A STROKE

It is important to recognize and treat a stroke within three hours of the onset of symptoms. Symptoms may include the abrupt onset of:

  • Numbness, weakness, or tingling on one or both sides of the body

  • Blurred vision in one or both eyes

  • Slurred speech or difficulty understanding speech

  • Dizziness or vertigo

  • Severe headache

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